10.20.14. Studio Ghibli,
alliebirdseed:

Inktober day 9 - My favorite witch!

alliebirdseed:

Inktober day 9 - My favorite witch!

(via flamiekitten)

39771

wtfeveridgaf:

jumpingbutnotforjoy:

Goth

Out of every pun and play on words I’ve seen on this site, this is the one that makes me so unreasonably angry.

wtfeveridgaf:

jumpingbutnotforjoy:

Goth

Out of every pun and play on words I’ve seen on this site, this is the one that makes me so unreasonably angry.

(Source: lysergicyugen, via skinsky)

82177

10.20.14.
victroladoll:


captainalbertalexander:

sutexii:

pooh-bear and piglet ❤

holy shit

THIS IS MY NEW FAVORITE THING EVER!!

victroladoll:

captainalbertalexander:

sutexii:

pooh-bear and piglet

holy shit

THIS IS MY NEW FAVORITE THING EVER!!

(via spoopy-dettsu)

78167

hermionemollycharliepond:

just-raowolf:

edenwolfie:

my year 8 students had to do a budgeting activity pretending they were living out of home on $2000 a month and I find this written on there help I can’t fucking breathe

We had to do this and I was partnered with a boy whose parents are a scientist and a doctor. My family spawned the book: Top Drawer Villain - autobiography of a London criminal.
First of all, we had to choose where we would shop. He wanted to buy from Booths. “We are not buying from Booths," I snapped. "Get on Asda’s website right now." His face froze.
“A-Asda?" he whispered. "But that’s where… The Lower Classes shop.”
This was a good start.
We then had to decide on a menu. We started on breakfast. “Toast," he said.
“Toast," I said. "Great. Look, Asda has its own wholemeal—”
“Warburton’s thick-slice white bread. Nothing else. With olive oil.”
“You WHAT?" I choked. "You have olive oil, on your toast, in the morning?”
He frowned. “Who doesn’t?”
“Okay," I said, "but what will the children eat?”
He gaped at me. “The children? We have children?”
We continued. All was well until it came to what we would have on our sandwiches. We even sorted out the children’s lunch - they, of course, would get free school meals. “Yes," he agreed; "if we can’t even afford Bertolli then they can get school meals on the government.”
He asked what dressing we should have on our ham. “Nuh-uh," I said. "Can’t have ham. I’m vegetarian.”
“But I’m not.”
“Yes, but we’re married and we can only afford one sandwich filler so it has to be vege—”
“We’re married!?”
“Of course we’re married! You’re devout Christian - how do you think I convinced you to have children?”
He shook his head, frowning. “Well I want ham. You’ll have to put back the washing powder - I need ham on my sandwiches.”
We continued. Finally, it was dinner. “Okay," he said, clearly thinking hard; "for dinner, we can have… Chicken nuggets and… Beans?”
“Vegetarian.”
“Vegetarian nuggets then. And beans.”
“We need vegetables. The children have to have a balanced diet.”
“You and your children!" he yelled, and the whole class looked around.
“They’re your children too!" I screamed back.
He leapt to his feet, shaking his head and looking distraught. “I don’t believe it - I don’t believe you! I wouldn’t have your children!”
“Please," I cried, standing up also. "Don’t—”
“I want a divorce!”
And he walked out of the classroom.
The teacher stood up and stared between me and the door through which he had vanished. “I’m sorry," I whispered, "but we couldn’t do it any more. There were just too many differences - I can’t live with someone who thinks champagne is a budget.”
I can’t wait to see this guy when he gets to university.

READ THE WHOLE THING

hermionemollycharliepond:

just-raowolf:

edenwolfie:

my year 8 students had to do a budgeting activity pretending they were living out of home on $2000 a month and I find this written on there help I can’t fucking breathe

We had to do this and I was partnered with a boy whose parents are a scientist and a doctor. My family spawned the book: Top Drawer Villain - autobiography of a London criminal.

First of all, we had to choose where we would shop. He wanted to buy from Booths. “We are not buying from Booths," I snapped. "Get on Asda’s website right now." His face froze.

A-Asda?" he whispered. "But that’s where… The Lower Classes shop.

This was a good start.

We then had to decide on a menu. We started on breakfast. “Toast," he said.

Toast," I said. "Great. Look, Asda has its own wholemeal—

Warburton’s thick-slice white bread. Nothing else. With olive oil.

You WHAT?" I choked. "You have olive oil, on your toast, in the morning?

He frowned. “Who doesn’t?

Okay," I said, "but what will the children eat?

He gaped at me. “The children? We have children?

We continued. All was well until it came to what we would have on our sandwiches. We even sorted out the children’s lunch - they, of course, would get free school meals. “Yes," he agreed; "if we can’t even afford Bertolli then they can get school meals on the government.

He asked what dressing we should have on our ham. “Nuh-uh," I said. "Can’t have ham. I’m vegetarian.

But I’m not.

Yes, but we’re married and we can only afford one sandwich filler so it has to be vege—

We’re married!?

Of course we’re married! You’re devout Christian - how do you think I convinced you to have children?

He shook his head, frowning. “Well I want ham. You’ll have to put back the washing powder - I need ham on my sandwiches.

We continued. Finally, it was dinner. “Okay," he said, clearly thinking hard; "for dinner, we can have… Chicken nuggets and… Beans?

Vegetarian.

Vegetarian nuggets then. And beans.

We need vegetables. The children have to have a balanced diet.

You and your children!" he yelled, and the whole class looked around.

They’re your children too!" I screamed back.

He leapt to his feet, shaking his head and looking distraught. “I don’t believe it - I don’t believe you! I wouldn’t have your children!

Please," I cried, standing up also. "Don’t—

I want a divorce!

And he walked out of the classroom.

The teacher stood up and stared between me and the door through which he had vanished. “I’m sorry," I whispered, "but we couldn’t do it any more. There were just too many differences - I can’t live with someone who thinks champagne is a budget.

I can’t wait to see this guy when he gets to university.

READ THE WHOLE THING

(via notsundere)

339527

10.20.14. pets,cats,

(Source: corporation-cats)

612

10.20.14.
kaijutegu:

butthurtherpetologist:

You seem to have dropped your long dogs there.

I hate it when spaghetti falls out of my pocket and gets all over the floor.

kaijutegu:

butthurtherpetologist:

You seem to have dropped your long dogs there.

I hate it when spaghetti falls out of my pocket and gets all over the floor.

(Source: pumpkinchemicals, via remonraimu)

6065

10.20.14.
hitimadvice:

profeminist:

Double standard, illustrated.

There it is; truth for your consideration.

hitimadvice:

profeminist:

Double standard, illustrated.

There it is; truth for your consideration.

(via ineffableboyfriends)

23711

10.20.14.
the-oncoming-glowcloud:

Day 14: Orange

the-oncoming-glowcloud:

Day 14: Orange

2659

10.20.14. Important,

“ Let’s examine a traditionally male-dominated role that is very well-respected, and well-paid, in many parts of the world—that of a doctor. In the UK, it is listed as one of the top ten lucrative careers, and the average annual income of a family doctor in the US is well into six figures. It also confers on you significant social status, and a common stereotype in Asian communities is of parents encouraging their children to become doctors.

One of my lecturers at university once presented us with this thought exercise: why are doctors so highly paid, and so well-respected? Our answers were predictable. Because they save lives, their skills are extremely important, and it takes years and years of education to become one. All sound, logical reasons. But these traits that doctors possess are universal. So why is it, she asked, that doctors in Russia are so lowly paid? Making less than £7,500 a year, it is one of the lowest paid professions in Russia, and poorly respected at that. Why is this?

The answer is crushingly, breathtakingly simple. In Russia, the majority of doctors are women. Here’s a quote from Carol Schmidt, a geriatric nurse practitioner who toured medical facilities in Moscow: “Their status and pay are more like our blue-collar workers, even though they require about the same amount of training as the American doctor… medical practice is stereotyped as a caring vocation ‘naturally suited‘ to women, [which puts it at] a second-class level in the Soviet psyche.”

What this illustrates perfectly is this—women are not devalued in the job market because women’s work is seen to have little value. It is the other way round. Women’s work is devalued in the job market because women are seen to have little value. ”

Patriarchy’s Magic Trick: How Anything Perceived As Women’s Work Immediately Sheds Its Value | Crates and Ribbons (via muffdiver)

(via kaxen)

24342

10.20.14. Perfection,
aspiringdoctors:


A classic.

DYING

aspiringdoctors:

A classic.

DYING

(via rubberbird)

169663

10.20.14. naw,teenlock,

ya-ssui:

Robstar snuggle doodle dump! ovo/

They are going to be the death of me. Someone stop me.

(via remonraimu)

64272

10.20.14. mf,

Martin Freeman, on the set of Fargo

(Source: gatissmark, via areyoutryingtodeduceme)

609

imrisah:

And puberty had made them so that one was tall enough to press cute kisses on the head of the other, and the other was short enough to reach for the tall one’s arse with no effort whatsoever <3

imrisah:

And puberty had made them so that one was tall enough to press cute kisses on the head of the other, and the other was short enough to reach for the tall one’s arse with no effort whatsoever <3

(via mindpalaceofversailles)

710

10.20.14. AT,huh,

divawitha-d:

Adventure Time: Marceline Gone Adrift

Bubbline in space, coming January 2015. Sign me up!

(via roquereptil)

534

10.20.14. Wha?,

Gabriel Perez by Jimmy Backius.

(Source: trashyprinces, via jessamygriffin)

5433